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Rankin Physiotherapy

Facial Palsy Rehabilitation - Vancouver, British Columbia

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Alberta Facial Neuromuscular Retraining Program



On November 3, 2017, amid swirling snow and minus temperatures, the Facial Neuromuscular Retraining Foundation course took place in Calgary. 9 therapists from Calgary, Edmonton and Red Deer were in attendance with a variety of professional backgrounds: speech language pathologists, physical therapists and an occupational therapist.

(L to R) Kristin Bell, Karrie Page, Pauline Dueck, Nathan Doerksen, Karen Schultz, Jackie Diels, Tania Buchanan, Sarah Cote-Lechelt, Jana Rieger, Jay Cooling, Heather Brickwell

On the following two days, November 4 and 5, six therapists continued on to do the Facial Neuromuscular Retraining Practical workshop. This involved seeing a wonderful group of facial patients who gave up their time to be models for the learning therapists. The participants practiced assessment, education and treatment with support of experienced therapists: Susan Rankin, Pauline Dueck, Kristin Bell, Heather Brickwell, Jay Cooling, and our special guest, Jackie Diels. There was a lot of learning happening for everyone as the experienced therapists also picked up tips from each other.

The newly trained Alberta facial therapists are: Karrie Page, Karen Schultz and Nathan Doerksen from Red Deer. Sarah Cote-Lechelt, Tania Buchanan and Jana Rieger are from Edmonton.

(L to R) Nathan Doerksen, Karrie Page, Karen Schultz, Tania Buchanan, Sarah Cote-Lechelt, Jana Rieger

Contact Information:

Nathan Doerksen, Physical Therapist
Red Deer Hospital, Out Patient Physiotherapy Department
tel: 403-406-5538
nathan.doerksen@albertahealthservices.ca

Karrie Page, Registered Speech Language Pathologist
Red Deer Hospital, Red Deer Alberta
tel: 403-342-8678
Karrie.page@ahs.ca

Karen Schultz, Physical Therapist
Red Deer Hospital, Out Patient Physiotherapy Department
tel: 1-403-406-5538
karen.schultz2@albertahealthservices.ca

Tania Buchanan, Occupational Therapist
Edmonton, Alberta (sees adults and paediatric patients in Edmonton)
taniabuchanan24@gmail.com

Sarah Cote-Lechelt, Physical Therapist
Blue Quill Physical Therapy, Edmonton, Alberta
tel: (780)988-2222
Sardave@shaw.ca

Jana Rieger, Speech Language Pathologist
University of Alberta
jana.rieger@ualberta.ca

International Facial Nerve Conference

The 13th International Facial Nerve Symposium (IFNS) was held August 3 to August 6, 2017 in Los Angeles.

The IFNS is held every 4 years and brings together Facial Plastic Surgeons, Ear Nose and Throat Surgeons, Head and Neck surgeons as well as Facial Therapists. There were 500 people from all over the world in attendance.

I had the opportunity to meet therapists from Belgium, Brazil, France, Great Britain, the Netherlands, Spain and of course the US, among other places.  As a facial therapist these Symposia allow me to share ideas about how we treat the face with others who share a similar passion for their work.

The next International Facial Nerve Symposium will be held in Seoul, Korea in 2022.

More Facial Therapists Trained in BC

nov-2016-fnr-class

From l to r, Kirsty Nicol, Susan Rankin, Sarah Kennedy and Christina Wong

This past week-end was an incredible time of learning and sharing. Three new Physiotherapists came to learn their Advanced Techniques in Facial Neuromuscular Retraining. We spent time discussing, assessing, and treating a variety of facial palsy patients.

Thank you to all my patients who so generously offered their time while allowing us to scrutinize their faces. Thanks also to Maria Zerjav who kindly gave us access to her clinic  and provided valuable assistance.

The three new Physiotherapists are:

Kirsty Nicol who works at Neuromotion Physiotherapy, 303-531 Yates St., Victoria, (250-590-7878). I am very pleased to have someone in Victoria who can see island patients.

Sarah Kennedy who works from Westside Physiotherapy and Hand Clinic, 230-1245 West Broadway, Vancouver (604-731-6225). Sarah joins Maria Zerjav who owns and works at the same clinic and was advanced trained in February.

Christina Wong works at Electra Health Floor, 970 Burrard St. and 535 Hornby St., Vancouver, (604-685-4325). Christina’s practice is conveniently located in downtown Vancouver near St Paul’s Hospital.

 

Cotton Swabs Can Be Dangerous!

never-use-cotton-swabs

I frequently talk to people about their use of cotton swabs. If you read the outside of a Q-tips box, it says not for use inside the ear. However, I don’t think too many people read that.   For many people, using cotton swabs in their ears is a daily ritual to clean the water out of their ears and to get wax out. So why is that dangerous?

Well, as the picture above shows, at the extreme, you can go too deep and pierce your ear drum. If you ever have bleeding, pain and/or a gush of fluid come out of your ear, then you know you’ve gone too far! This could also cause vestibular and hearing problems. Most people want to remove wax from their ears because they feel itchy, sticky or they think their hearing may be affected. We have ear wax, or cerumen, for a reason. A certain amount of wax is meant to be in the ear canal and we need it there for protection. Removing too much of the wax can actually make your ear more itchy. Some people produce a lot of wax and want to remove it as it might be visible or be blocking their hearing. When you insert a cotton swab down in your ear to remove the wax, you more often push the wax further down the canal. Once down it dries out and becomes impacted there. This is more of a concern for blocking hearing and may require a visit to the Doctor for syringing it out.

So what are we supposed to do? You can continue to use cotton swabs on the external ear, but to clean the wax out of the ear, you are best to put a small amount of warm oil or warm water into the ear canal. It will lift the wax out of the canal harmlessly.

So remember what our Grandmothers used to say ” Nothing smaller than your elbow should go in your ear!”

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