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Rankin Physiotherapy

Facial Palsy and Vestibular Treatment

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Physiotherapists and Physical Therapists

What’s the difference between a Physiotherapist and Physical Therapist?

I am asked this question frequently. My answer is, most often, “There is no difference.”

 

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Officially, any graduate of a University physiotherapy program in Canada is designated as a Physiotherapist. In the US, similarly trained graduates are designated as Physical Therapists, thus the terms are used interchangeably.

 

In Canada

In Canada, the physiotherapy profession is a self-regulated and recognized health profession. Physiotherapists are primary care practitioners, in other words, a client doesn’t need a doctor’s referral to see a Physiotherapist.

Physiotherapy is exclusively performed by a physiotherapist or another trained individual working under a physiotherapist’s direction and supervision. The Canadian Physiotherapy Association (CPA)  emphasizes that an assessment or evaluation – unless provided by a physiotherapist – is not physiotherapy.

Although the titles physiotherapist and physical therapist, including their abbreviations and equivalents in other languages, are protected titles under all provincial and territorial legislation, the practice terms (physiotherapy and physical therapy) are not. CPA believes that the practice terms should receive legislative protection in all Canadian jurisdictions and be reserved for use by the regulated physiotherapy professional. Protection of title and clarity of professional activity is considered important for the protection of the public.

When seeking physiotherapy or physical therapy treatment be sure it is provided by a certified Physiotherapist or in the US, a certified Physical Therapist.

Do Allergies Make Me Dizzy?

allergiesThe pollens are out and hay fever season is upon us.

It is always interesting to me that there is a swell in vestibular problems at this time of year. People often ask if allergies could be the cause of their dizziness. The short answer is: we don’t know for sure.

The literature suggests that allergies could possibly make symptoms worse but it is not clear if they cause the vestibular system to malfunction.

If we look at the anatomy of the nose and ear, the eustachian tube connects between the nose and the middle ear. It is usually air filled and helps us to maintain our pressure gradient; for example when flying or driving up or down a mountain. When we have allergies our nose gets stuffed and the eustachian tube gets blocked. This can change the pressure in the ear complex and can lead to dizziness. A good nasal decongestant, antihistamines and avoiding the allergens, as much as possible, will help get you through this beautiful, but pollen-filled season.

Facial Neuromuscular Retraining Therapists

Following the Advanced Facial Neuromuscular Retraining course last weekend, I am excited to introduce the four new advanced trained facial therapists in Metro Vancouver.

New FNR Therapists

From left to right:

Catherine Chan; who will see patients at GFStrong and Neuromotion,

Maria Zerjav; treating facial patients at Westside Physiotherapy and Hand clinic,

Amy Tao; working out of Neuro-ability and Cedar Chiropractic and Physiotherapy in Burnaby,

Sarah Hearne; from St. Paul’s Hospital and a private clinic downtown.

Please add Catherine, Maria, Amy and Sarah to your list of facial therapists in BC.

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